Governance , Legislation & Litigation , Privacy

Will California Privacy Law Be a Model for Other States?

Seattle's Chief Privacy Officer, Ginger Armbruster, Expects More State Privacy Regs
Giner Armbruster, chief privacy officer, city of Seattle

When it goes into effect in 2020, the California Consumer Privacy Act will give citizens of that state greater control over their personal data. Ginger Armbruster, the chief privacy officer for the city Seattle, believes this trend toward greater personal privacy will spread across the U.S.

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"What it means is that security professionals and privacy professionals need to pay attention because of potential liability," Armbruster says.

In a video interview at Information Security Media Group's recent Fraud and Breach Summit in Seattle, Armbruster describes

  • Why being compliant with the EU's General Data Protection Regulation does not mean your organization is ready for CCPA compliance;
  • How new demands for privacy are sweeping through the U.S.;
  • How businesses and government organizations are working together on privacy issues.

As the city of Seattle's chief privacy officer, Armbruster leads a team of privacy specialists in the execution of the city's privacy program, following a principles-based approach to the city's management of the public's personal and sensitive information. Prior to this role, she worked for Microsoft on an international team of privacy specialists to resolve issues associated with multi-million-dollar marketing initiatives. She spent the first 20 years of her career working in sales and marketing for Fortune 500 companies such as IBM, Hewlett-Packard and Johnson & Johnson, as well as several medical technology startup companies.


About the Author

Scott Ferguson

Scott Ferguson

Managing Editor, News Desk

Ferguson is the managing editor for the news desk at Information Security Media Group. He's been covering the IT industry for more than 13 years. Before joining ISMG, Ferguson was editor-in-chief at eWEEK and director of audience development for InformationWeek. He's also written and edited for Light Reading, Security Now, Enterprise Cloud News, TU-Automotive, Dice Insights and DevOps.com.




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